Archive for the ‘Windows Server 2019’ Category

Effective March 31, 2021, the Azure portal will no longer support Internet Explorer 11. Start using the new Microsoft Edge for speed, security and privacy   Leave a comment

Well on every server or Windows device there is the Internet explorer and prepairing some server workloads you may need some browser and may need to connect to Azure. using an old browser is always an bad idea.

When setting up a new server what ever version it is I always remove the IE icon and install Msedge this works fine and gives me a more secure feeling.

Microsoft Edge

Opening the Azure portal with IE you will see a warning about non supported browser.

Microsoft Edge

With the option to download the Edge directly

Microsoft Edge

The portal still opens in IE but using some functions are not working sample as anything that will use HTML5

Microsoft Edge

Official Download links for Microsoft Edge Stable Enterprise

I’m not 100% sure it’s final but anyone who wishes/wants can test it.

Microsoft Edge Stable Enterprise

X64.msi
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=2093437

X86.msi
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=2093505

MicrosoftEdgePolicyTemplates.cab
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=2099616

MicrosoftEdgeIntunePolicyTemplate.cab
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=2099617

macOS.pkg
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=2093438

Blocker Toolkit to disable automatic delivery of Microsoft Edge
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/deployedge/microsoft-edge-blocker-toolkit

So when you want to auto mate this the following lines could be used to install quickly Microsoft Edge

#Create temp folder
New-Item -Path ‘C:\temp’ -ItemType Directory -Force | Out-Null

#Install Edge
Invoke-WebRequest  -Uri "
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=2093437" -OutFile ‘c:\temp\MicrosoftEdgeEnterpriseX64.msi’
Invoke-Expression -Command ‘C:\temp\MicrosoftEdgeEnterpriseX64.msi /quiet /norestart’

This will install Microsoft Edge and you can set this in a powershell script and in the GPO that way all new servers will get Microsoft Edge.

 

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Windows Server LTSC vNext Preview Build 20206 #SMB #WindowsServer #StorageSpacesDirect #WinServ #AzureHybrid   Leave a comment

A new build of the Windows Server vNext Long-Term Servicing Channel (LTSC) release that contains both the Desktop Experience and Server Core installation options for Datacenter and Standard editions Build 20206. There are a lot off under water improvements. like the SMB 3.1.1. protocol better security and performance capabilities. Extended Migration options.

Windows Server LTSC vNext Preview Build 20206

What is new :

  • File Services: SMB improvements
  • Storage Migration Services improvements
  • AFS Tiering support preview
  • Compress files copied over SMB with robocopy
  • SMB Direct + RDMA encryption

More in-depth on the improvements : https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2020/09/02/announcing-windows-server-vnext-preview-build-20206/

How to Download ?

Directly on the Windows Server Insider Preview download page.

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windowsinsiderpreviewserver

Choose the LTSC ISO or VHDX, it’s a quick download and ready to start with.

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It is great that There are 18 languages for the server OS but personally I really hate this. keep your server English. Issues can easily be found and people can help you better but his is totally my opinion.

Windows Server vNext Long-Term Servicing Channel Preview is available in ISO format in 18 languages, and in VHDX format in English only.

The following keys allow for unlimited activations:
Standard: MFY9F-XBN2F-TYFMP-CCV49-RMYVH
Datacenter: 2KNJJ-33Y9H-2GXGX-KMQWH-G6H67

Windows Server vNext Semi-Annual Preview The Server Core Datacenter and Standard Editions are available in the 18 supported Server languages in ISO format and in VHDX format in English only.

The following keys allow for unlimited activations:
Standard: V6N4W-86M3X-J77X3-JF6XW-D9PRV
Datacenter: B69WH-PRNHK-BXVK3-P9XF7-XD84W

 Windows Server LTSC vNext Preview Build 20206

How to Download

Registered Insiders may navigate directly to the Windows Server Insider Preview download page.  See the Additional Downloads dropdown for Windows Admin Center and other supplemental apps and products. If you have not yet registered as an Insider, see GETTING STARTED WITH SERVER on the Windows Insiders for Business portal.

Want to learn more about Windows Server Hybrid and Windows Server on Azure IaaS VMs?

Manage hybrid workloads with Azure Arc

You will learn to describe Azure Arc, implement Azure Arc with on-premises server instances, deploy Azure policies with Azure Arc, and use role-based access control (RBAC) to restrict access to Log Analytics data.

After completing this module, you will be able to:

  • Describe Azure Arc.
  • Explain how to onboard on-premises Windows Server instances in Azure Arc.
  • Connect hybrid machines to Azure from the Azure portal.
  • Use Azure Arc to manage devices.
  • Restrict access using RBAC.

Check out the learning module here.

Implement scale and high availability with Windows Server VM

You’ll learn how to implement scaling for virtual machine scale sets and load-balanced VMs. You’ll also learn how to implement Azure Site Recovery.

After completing this module, you will be able to:

  • Describe virtual machine scale sets.
  • Implement scaling.
  • Implement load-balancing virtual machines.
  • Implement Azure Site Recovery.

Check out the learning module here.

Start with Azure https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/?WT.mc_id=AZ-MVP-4025011

Start with Intune https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/mem/intune/fundamentals/free-trial-sign-up?WT.mc_id=EM-MVP-4025011

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/solutions/hybrid-cloud-app/?WT.mc_id=AZ-MVP-4025011

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Posted September 4, 2020 by Robert Smit [MVP] in Windows Server 2019

Tagged with

Deploy Windows Admin Center High Availability running on a Windows Server 2019 Cluster #winserv #WAC #WindowsAdminCenter #AzureArc #Azure #Hybrid   3 comments

The new new tool Windows Admin Center is THE tool to use when managing your Environment you can install this on almost any server (no Domain Controller) but even this device needs a reboot from time to time. Therefor we make the Windows Admin Center High available. When installing this on a cluster the Tools gets better uptime. And is there when you need it. The resources that are used is minimal.

Windows Admin Center is a new, locally-deployed, browser-based management tool set that lets you manage your Windows Servers with no Azure or cloud dependency. Windows Admin Center gives you full control over all aspects of your server infrastructure and is particularly useful for managing servers on private networks that are not connected to the Internet.

Windows Admin Center is the modern evolution of “in-box” management tools, like Server Manager and MMC. It complements System Center – it’s not a replacement.

First we take our cluster, in this case my test cluster witch runs all kinds of load.

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Get the latest Windows Admin center build. http://aka.ms/WACDownload

save this on the Cluster node, and remember you can’t run Windows Admin Center with IE – Internet Explorer!

When checking this I saw the Cluster team create already a Powershell Script to make the WAC HA. so there goes my blog.

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Well You can run the PowerShell Scripts. But that’s no Fun.  but I understand if you are busy and or you don’t want to know what is behind the script.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/manage/windows-admin-center/deploy/high-availability

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In this case I do it all manual, well not all there are some good parts in the Script

First we need a Certificate, I use a self signed and yes this needs to be changed every 90 days

Fill in the Variables 

$clientAccessPoint=”mvpwac03″
$tmpPassword = “Temppassword”
$certPath = “c:\temp\sme3.pfx”
#####
Write-Output “Creating self signed certificate”
    $domain= (Get-WmiObject win32_computersystem).Domain
    $dnsName = $clientAccessPoint+”.”+$domain
    $cert = New-SelfSignedCertificate -DnsName $dnsName -CertStoreLocation “cert:\LocalMachine\My” -NotAfter (Get-Date).AddMonths(3)
    $certPassword = ConvertTo-SecureString -String $tmpPassword -Force -AsPlainText
    $cert | Export-PfxCertificate -FilePath $certPath -Password $certPassword | Out-Null 

 

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Import the Certificate

$cert.Import($certPath, $certPassword,’DefaultKeySet’)

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Save the Thumbprint for later

$cert.Thumbprint

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Now We are installing the Windows Admin Center , I use a preview but get the latest version here http://aka.ms/WACDownload

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Don’t forget the trusted site checkbox.

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Here is the Thumbprint that is used in the Certificate , Next is installing the Windows Admin Center.

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Now that Windows Admin Center is installed We are almost ready.

The next steps are stopping the services and set this to manual as the Failover Cluster Manager controls the run status

Set-Service ServerManagementGateway -startuptype “manual”
Stop-Service ServerManagementGateway

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Now that this is ready we need to think about the file location as this is currently on the C drive.

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And we don’t want to have two or more configurations. there for we place this on the CSV volume.

Copy all the file into the CSV volume folder

imageimage

When this is done we are adjusting the Services.

imageimage

 

$staticAddress=”10.255.255.222″
$portNumber=”443″
$smePath=”C:\ClusterStorage\vdisk20\ux”
$certThumbprint=”1D243A17BBD62271DA0DF8EE4FF0FD65C5AE5A37″
$clientAccessPoint=”mvpwac03″
$registryPath = “HKLM:\Software\Microsoft\ServerManagementGateway\Ha”

    New-ItemProperty -Path $registryPath -Name IsHaEnabled -Value “true” -PropertyType String -Force | Out-Null
    New-ItemProperty -Path $registryPath -Name StoragePath -Value $smePath -PropertyType String -Force | Out-Null
    New-ItemProperty -Path $registryPath -Name Thumbprint -Value $certThumbprint -PropertyType String -Force | Out-Null
    New-ItemProperty -Path $registryPath -Name Port -Value $portNumber -PropertyType DWord -Force | Out-Null
    New-ItemProperty -Path $registryPath -Name ClientAccessPoint -Value $clientAccessPoint -PropertyType String -Force | Out-Null
    $staticAddressValue = $staticAddress -join ‘,’
    New-ItemProperty -Path $registryPath -Name StaticAddress -Value $staticAddress -PropertyType String -Force | Out-Null
   
    New-ItemProperty -Path HKLM:\Software\Microsoft\ServerManagementGateway -Name InstallDir -Value $smePath -PropertyType String -Force | Out-Null
    New-ItemProperty -Path HKLM:\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\ServerManagementGateway -Name ImagePath -Value $smePath\sme.exe -PropertyType String -Force | Out-Null

   
    #grant permissions to Network Service for the UX folder
    $Acl = Get-Acl $UxFolder
    $sID = New-Object System.Security.Principal.SecurityIdentifier(“S-1-5-20″)
    $Ar = New-Object  system.security.accesscontrol.filesystemaccessrule($sID,”FullControl”,”ContainerInherit,ObjectInherit”,”None”, “Allow”)
    $Acl.SetAccessRule($Ar)
    Set-Acl $UxFolder $Acl

 

After running this the path changed to the CSV location and the HA values are there

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The Windows Admin Center HA values are there.

The last step on this cluster node is creating the cluster resource.

$staticAddress=”10.255.255.222″
$clientAccessPoint=”mvpwac03″
$registryPath2 = “SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ServerManagementGateway\Ha”
   
Add-ClusterGenericServiceRole -ServiceName ServerManagementGateway -Name $clientAccessPoint -CheckpointKey $registryPath2 -StaticAddress $staticAddress

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Remember the HA cluster resource does not need the  HKLM:\ as in the other variables.

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Now we have installed the Windows Admin Center in the Cluster.  For all the other nodes in the cluster we need to do almost the same.

Or we could export the Register keys and add them in the nodes as we already placed the files on the CSV and created a cluster resource.

All the other nodes don’t have a Windows Admin Center services. Using the register keys is working but you will need a reboot.  As we create first a fake services and then place the regkeys no reboot is needed. Or just import the register keys and do a reboot of the node.

New-Service -Name ServerManagementGateway -DisplayName “Windows Admin Center” -BinaryPathName “C:\ClusterStorage\vdisk20\ux”

First regkey <>

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ServerManagementGateway]
“Version”=”1.1.24609.0”
“InstallDir”=”C:\\ClusterStorage\\vdisk20\\ux”
“SmePort”=”443”
“UseHttps”=”1”
“DevMode”=””
“DataEncryptionCertificateThumbprint”=”83D5FBC5AD758C2B23BADBD83117AC5EAA0E8F2B”
“RedirectPort80″=”1”

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ServerManagementGateway\Ha]
“IsHaEnabled”=”true”
“StoragePath”=”C:\\ClusterStorage\\vdisk20\\ux”
“Thumbprint”=”1D243A17BBD62271DA0DF8EE4FF0FD65C5AE5A37”
“Port”=dword:000001bb
“ClientAccessPoint”=”mvpwac03”
“StaticAddress”=”10.255.255.222”

 

Second Regkey <>

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\ServerManagementGateway]
“Type”=dword:00000010
“Start”=dword:00000003
“ErrorControl”=dword:00000001
“ImagePath”=”C:\\ClusterStorage\\vdisk20\\ux\\sme.exe”
“DisplayName”=”Windows Admin Center”
“ObjectName”=”NT Authority\\NetworkService”
“Description”=”Windows Admin Center”
“FailureActions”=hex:80,51,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,03,00,00,00,14,00,00,\
  00,00,00,00,00,d0,07,00,00,00,00,00,00,d0,07,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00
“Environment”=hex(7):43,00,4f,00,4d,00,50,00,55,00,54,00,45,00,52,00,4e,00,41,\
  00,4d,00,45,00,3d,00,4d,00,56,00,50,00,57,00,41,00,43,00,30,00,33,00,00,00,\
  5f,00,43,00,4c,00,55,00,53,00,54,00,45,00,52,00,5f,00,4e,00,45,00,54,00,57,\
  00,4f,00,52,00,4b,00,5f,00,46,00,51,00,44,00,4e,00,5f,00,3d,00,4d,00,56,00,\
  50,00,57,00,41,00,43,00,30,00,33,00,2e,00,6d,00,76,00,70,00,2e,00,6c,00,6f,\
  00,63,00,61,00,6c,00,00,00,5f,00,43,00,4c,00,55,00,53,00,54,00,45,00,52,00,\
  5f,00,4e,00,45,00,54,00,57,00,4f,00,52,00,4b,00,5f,00,48,00,4f,00,53,00,54,\
  00,4e,00,41,00,4d,00,45,00,5f,00,3d,00,4d,00,56,00,50,00,57,00,41,00,43,00,\
  30,00,33,00,00,00,5f,00,43,00,4c,00,55,00,53,00,54,00,45,00,52,00,5f,00,4e,\
  00,45,00,54,00,57,00,4f,00,52,00,4b,00,5f,00,4e,00,41,00,4d,00,45,00,5f,00,\
  3d,00,4d,00,56,00,50,00,57,00,41,00,43,00,30,00,33,00,00,00,00,00

With this in place all nodes can run Windows admin center in HA mode, but it will not run on IE. and this is the only default browser on the server. To test if it is working you will need Edge or Chrome.

image

As you can see it is not that simple to make things high available. Using the Powershell scripts provided by microsoft But if using these script you need to rename the MSI file if you are using the insiderspreview or any other build that is not named as ServerManagementGateway.msi

WindowsAdminCenterPreview1808.msi rename to ServerManagementGateway.msi 

You can deploy Windows Admin Center in a failover cluster to provide high availability for your Windows Admin Center gateway service. The solution provided is an active-passive solution, where only one instance of Windows Admin Center is active. If one of the nodes in the cluster fails, Windows Admin Center gracefully fails over to another node, letting you continue managing the servers in your environment seamlessly.

High-availability deployment scripts from Windows Admin Center HA Setup Scripts zip file. Download the .zip file containing these scripts to your local machine and then copy the scripts as needed.

 

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How to join Windows Server 2019 to the Azure AD #AAD #Winserv #WIMVP #AD #Hybrid #Azure   Leave a comment

For Some time it is possible to join devices to the Azure AD. Personally I know this was working for Windows 10 but Windows Server 2019, in this blog post I’ll show some ideas and thoughts. It would be nice  if native Azure MFA would work to log on. Also for some options your Azure AD needs to be at least P1.

Organizations can now utilize Azure Active Directory (AD) authentication for their Azure virtual machines (VMs) running Windows Server 2019 Datacenter edition or Windows 10 1809 and later. Using Azure AD to authenticate to VMs provides you with a way to centrally control and enforce policies. Tools like Azure Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) and Azure AD Conditional Access allow you to control who can access a VM. This Blog shows you how to create and configure a Windows Server 2019 VM to use Azure AD authentication and how to remove the Azure AD join and switch back to Active directory Domain join.

The following Windows distributions are currently supported during the preview of this feature:

  • Windows Server 2019 Datacenter
  • Windows 10 1809 and later

So the machine below is in a workgroup but Azure AD joined. on a server is it not visible that the machine is Azure AD joined in the UI.

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In the Configuration properties in an Azure VM we can set the following properties. Login with AAD credentials. This is during creation of the new VM that way the VM is directly Azure AD joined.

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Just deployed a new VM. and this VM is Azure AD joined, but what if you want to domain join this machine can we do a hybrid domain join for short NO.

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Remember Some options only work if you have a P1 or a P2 Azure AD license here you can find the differences https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/pricing/details/active-directory/

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Looking at the devices in the Azure AD devices we can see the Server is Azure AD Joined.

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Giving Access to the VM can be based on RBAC

Two RBAC roles are used to authorize VM login:

  • Virtual Machine Administrator Login: Users with this role assigned can log in to an Azure virtual machine with administrator privileges.
  • Virtual Machine User Login: Users with this role assigned can log in to an Azure virtual machine with regular user privileges.

To allow a user to log in to the VM over RDP, you must assign either the Virtual Machine Administrator Login or Virtual Machine User Login role. An Azure user with the Owner or Contributor roles assigned for a VM do not automatically have privileges to log in to the VM over RDP. This is to provide audited separation between the set of people who control virtual machines versus the set of people who can access virtual machines.

Select the VM and choose IAM press Add and add role assignment. just as you do with other workloads.

image

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Or use the Azure CLI

$username=(az account show –query user.name –output tsv)

$vm=(az vm show –resource-group rsg-adjoin001 –name 2019vmadjoin –query id -o tsv)

az role assignment create  –role "Virtual Machine Administrator Login" –assignee $username –scope $vm

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But what If we want to do a Domain join ?

There is no hybrid domain join and no console unjoin. Redeploy would not be the best option right.

image

With the DSRegCmd /Leave we can unregister the VM from the Azure AD.

image

now back to the Domain join without a reboot we can join the VM direct to the Classic Active directory.

image

Remember a reboot is needed for this.

image

Now the VM is normal AD joined.

This option is still in preview and after removing the Azure AD still shows that the VM is Azure Ad joined, it seems there is no trigger to remove the AADLoginForWindows extention in the VM.

The hybrid join could me a great addition to make VM’s connectable with Azure MFA. But for now we can assign policy’s and rules.

 

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Posted April 6, 2020 by Robert Smit [MVP] in Windows Server 2019

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Migrate VHD Disks to Azure Disks – Direct-upload to Azure managed disks #Azure #Upload #Disk #Migrate #VHD #storage #MVPBuzz #WIMVP   1 comment

When I saw this new option I thought well could be interesting, prep some disks in advance and upload later the disk.  Looks quicker than staging the vhd first. There are two ways you can bring an on-premises VHD to Azure as a managed disks:

  1. Stage the VHD into a storage account before converting it into a managed disk. 
  2. Attach an empty managed disk to a virtual machine and do copy.

Both these ways have disadvantage.The first option requires extra storage account to manage while the second option has extra cost of running virtual machine. Direct-upload addresses both these issues and provides a simplified workflow by allowing copy of an on-premises VHD directly as a managed disk. You can use it to upload to Standard HDD, Standard SSD, and Premium SSD managed disks of all the supported sizes. With this new option Migration  could speed up and it seems less work.

Now days Microsoft want to do a lot in the Azure CLI, Working with this and personally I like the Azure CLI to do quick things but for testing and building I like the PowerShell options. So in this blog post I show you how to do upload your VHD to a managed Azure disk.

Starting this I noticed the weirdness of PowerShell I did not have the proper options, It seems I run some older versions of the Azure Az module.

SO running new Azure options with PowerShell make sure you run the latest version. This is not needed in the Azure CLI.

I had version 2.7.0 running and I needed 2.8.0 Do a uninstall of the old version  

Uninstall-AllModules -TargetModule Az -Version 2.7.0 –Force

Or if you have a lot of old versions running uninstall them all.

$versions = (Get-InstalledModule Az -AllVersions | Select-Object Version)
$versions[0..($versions.Length-2)]  | foreach { Uninstall-AllModules -TargetModule Az -Version ($_.Version) -Force }

 

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And of course you can run this in the Azure CLI  with the following command

az disk create -n mydiskname1 -g disk1 -l westeurope --for-upload --upload-size-bytes 10737418752 --sku standard_lrs
 
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But where is the fun on doing this, Right.

For creating a Managed disk in the GUI there are only a few steps but then you need to add this to a Virtual machine and copy over the data. time consuming

image

 

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Lets create a powershell script that will pick the right disk size and upload the VHD to Azure as a Managed disk.

First we need to see what size my VHD file is to make sure the disk has enough disk space.

$vhdSizeBytes = (Get-Item "I:\Hyperv-old\MVPMGTDC01\mvpdc0120161023143512.vhd").length

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So I need a disk size of 136367309312

Our next step is create a proper disk configuration. with placement in the correct region and resource group.

 

#Provide the Azure region where Managed Disk will be located.

$Location = “westeurope”

#Provide the name of your resource group where Managed Disks will be created.

$ResourceGroupName =”rsguploaddisk001”

#Provide the name of the Managed Disk

$DiskName = “mvpdc01-Disk01”

New-AzResourceGroup -Name $ResourceGroupName -Location $location

$diskconfig = New-AzDiskConfig -SkuName ‘Standard_LRS’ -OsType ‘Windows’ -UploadSizeInBytes $vhdSizeBytes -Location $location -CreateOption ‘Upload’

$diskconfig

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Now that the configuration is set we can actual create a new Disk.

New-AzDisk -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName  -DiskName $DiskName -Disk $diskconfig

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Now that the disk is created we can see this in the Azure portal also.

 

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The details of the just created disk.

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Comparing the disk configuration this is now empty and the Disk state is ReadyToUpload. 

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At this point we don’t have access to the disk and we can’t upload the original disk to the Azure Managed disk. Therefore we need to grand access to this disk. This is done in a time frame like 24 hours or shorter it depends on the time that is needed for the upload.

basic default is 24 hours = 86400 seconds but when done we revoke the access.


$diskSas = Grant-AzDiskAccess -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -DiskName $DiskName -DurationInSecond 86400 -Access ‘Write’

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And in the Portal you can see the Ready status is changed to Active Upload.

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When looking at the details of the disk in PowerShell we see the disk state of active upload.

$disk = Get-AzDisk -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -DiskName $DiskName

$disk

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Our next step is copy the VHD to the Azure Disk

AzCopy.exe copy "I:\Hyperv-old\MVPMGTDC01\mvpdc0120161023143512.vhd" $diskSas.AccessSAS –blob-type PageBlob

As I did not place any restrictions to the upload It will use my full bandwidth of Internet, this means a full 1Gbps connection.

 

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Now that the Upload is completed we can revoke the access 

Revoke-AzDiskAccess -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroupName -DiskName $DiskName

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As you can see the disk state is now unattached and we can create a VM with this disk.

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The Disk type can’t be changed at this point but can be changed when the VM is deployed.

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Machine is quickly build and depending on the machine type you can change the disk type to SSD

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Posted October 18, 2019 by Robert Smit [MVP] in Azure, Windows Server 2019

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